Installation
The installation was fairly uneventful. This was a clean install to an 18.4GB SCSI drive. The drive previously had a Windows partition which I used Disk Druid to delete and repartition for LInux. This was probably the only snafu I hit because I kept getting an error, but it was just user error. After the third try I got the partitions straightened out.

The biggest mistake I made was placing GRUB on the master boot record (MBR) instead of on /dev/sdb1, since it wiped out my current install of AiRBoot and OS boot loaded that works great with OS/2.

First Reboot
Upon reboot I expected problems, just being pessimistic I guess, but the reboot went great. I was surprised by a wonderful graphical boot screen which is nice and simple. I love the show/hide detail button since I like to see what’s going on during booting especially the first time.

I ran into only one problem where smartd failed to start. I don’t much care since I have no idea what this is for 🙂 yet.

Welcome Screen
The to be expected Welcome Screen appeared and the user setup was flawless and simple. Nice touch.

Hardware detection
This impressed me the most since Fedora found all of my hardware, though I really don’t have anything that’s rare since my system used to run OS/2 Warp 4 which is extremely picky with hardware.

Printer horrors
Now I continue to struggle with the printer on Linux. I have a Canon S750 which is shared via Samba from another Linux (Red Hat 8). I installed the Turbo Print driver for it on that machine. So Windows prints just fine to the raw queue, but I don’t get all the nice feature on my Fedora install unless I purchase a driver for it. I found the S600 driver works, but it’s not the same. So if I were rating Fedora on printer drivers, I’d give it a 4 out of 10.

Summary
All in all. I found Fedora much more polished than Red Hat Linux 9. I’m going to try a Personal Desktop install on my other drive just to see how that installation goes. But I think I’ll leave Windows again and hang out with Fedora for a while.

One thought on “Fedora Core 1 Review

  1. smartd is for hard drives that have that S.M.A.R.T. support (to tell you when they think you should buy a new one 🙂

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